Guides, Webinars, Podcasts & More

Webinar

Finding Solutions with Steven Shapiro: A Systematic Approach for Reframing Questions

What will I learn in this Webinar? From innovation teams to creativity experts to crowdsourcing, we’ve turned from one source to another, spending endless cycles pursuing piecemeal solutions to each challenge we face. What if your organization had an effective and systematic approach to deal with of your Businesses Challenges? To find better solutions, you need to first ask better questions. The questions you ask determine which solutions you’ll see and which will remain hidden. Steven shares the formula to reframe any problem multiple ways, using 25 lenses to help you gain different perspectives. Steven Shapiro’s Innovation Journey Steven Shapiro is the author of “The Innovator’s Journey”, a book that details his experience leading innovation at companies like Motorola, P&G, and LEGO. In his book, Shapiro outlines a systematic approach for reframing questions that can lead to more innovative solutions. He believes that by changing the way we think about problems, we can open up new possibilities for finding creative solutions. Shapiro’s approach has been used by major companies to generate new ideas and solve difficult problems. For example, LEGO used Shapiro’s method to crowdsource ideas for new products and services. Gain a more in depth look with Steven’s book: Invisible Solutions – 25 Lenses that Reframe and Help Solve Difficult Business Problems

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Webinar

In conversation with Alte Leipziger: Building a successful Innovation Programme in the Insurance Industry

During this webinar Wazoku’s Bea Schofield will be talking to Klaudia and Philipp from Alte Leipziger about how they have managed to build and scale a successful crowdsourced innovation programme in the insurance industry. Who is Alte Leipziger (ALH Gruppe)? Alte Leipziger is a German insurance company that offers its services directly through its offices through throughout Europe. As a financial service provider that has been successful for many years, they offer customers all products relating to insurance and finance. They place particular emphasis on the personal insurance business, especially on the areas of life and health insurance. Guest speakers: Klaudia Soroka – Innovation Management Consultant at Alte LeipzigerPhilipp Koehler – Strategic Innovation Manager at Alte LeipzigerBea Schofield – Director of Customer Success at Wazoku

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Planning a Challenge – Part 3

Using Challenges brings specificity to innovation programs. Whether run internally or as part of an open innovation strategy, asking specific questions delivers specific outcomes. By asking for solutions to real problems, companies are better positioned to innovate across the business right away. In the third part of this mini-series on Challenge planning, we look at the final crucial element: communications. Having discussed the foundations of the Challenge in part one and the process of framing Challenges in part two, this is the final part you need for all your Challenge planning questions. We break the communication phase down into five areas and illustrate how the messaging should change at different stages of the Challenge process. In the full guide, we discuss what to communicate and when. From initial communications, through Challenge launch, and all the way to the communications sent out once the Challenge is completed.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Innovating with Suppliers

Creating a scalable innovation program requires the optimization of every element of a company’s operation. A business’s customers, internal employees, and external crowds all rely on this network interacting smoothly. Suppliers should also form a key consideration as part of the success of an organization’s innovation strategy. In two decades of running innovation Challenges, we’ve identified 5 reasons why a company should be innovating with suppliers. These include: Attracting new suppliers to come on boardCross-pollination of ideas between an eco-system of relevant suppliers For a full list of reasons why an organization should innovate with suppliers, tips on the process, and how to get started, download the full guide today.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Planning a Challenge – Part 2

Using Challenges brings specificity to innovation programs. Whether run internally or as part of an open innovation strategy, asking specific questions delivers specific outcomes. By asking for solutions to real problems, companies are better positioned to innovate across the business right away. This guide is the second of a three-part mini-series focusing on a vital element of the Challenge-Driven Methodology: the planning stage. In part one, we discussed the background. In this guide, we look at the framing of a Challenge. Breaking this framing phase down into five areas, we illustrate how to use metrics and voting as a way of measuring success, as well as discussing the submission and selection stages of the process. In the full guide, we also suggest what information needs to be included in any submissions, and how it’s possible to engage the crowd in initial evaluations. Finally, we explain how the selection and post-selection stages work.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Co-Creating with Customers

Customers are the lifeblood of any business. An organization that prioritizes too many moving parts ahead of those it sells to is likely to fall short of growth targets or, in some extreme scenarios, fold completely. Given this reality, it is surprising that the practice of using customers as part of an innovation process isn’t more commonplace. Co-creation can be used as a key strategy for transforming value propositions, working with customers, or complementary resources. Having run Challenges that use co-creation with customers as a great resource for new ideas, we’ve narrowed down the reasons why an organization would use it as a tactic. These reasons include: Shorter time-to-market: the continuous user feedback loops that co-creation with your customers provides means that it is easier to get new products or services to market in a quicker time. To see the full list of reasons why companies would co-create with customers, some best practices, and a set of tips on how to get started, download the full guide today.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Planning a Challenge – Part 1

Using Challenges brings specificity to innovation programs. Whether run internally or as part of an open innovation strategy, asking specific questions delivers specific outcomes. By asking for solutions to real problems, companies are better positioned to innovate across the business right away. This guide is the first of a three-part mini-series focusing on a vital element of the Challenge-Driven Methodology: the planning stage. First up, establishing the Challenge background is key. At this stage, we look at sponsorship and the framing of the question. We discuss which audience we want to be part of the solving process and how that solving process – including idea evaluation – will work. Finally, you’ll learn about timelines to ensure that a time-sensitive issue doesn’t have a Challenge that runs past a specific deadline. Download the full guide now to understand the five key phases of the Challenge background.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Improving Customer Experience

As the world of business has moved increasingly online, the need to identify, understand, and optimize how a business engages with customers has never been more critical. A key starting point in understanding how to use innovation to improve customer experience is knowing exactly what is meant by the term. Too many businesses still believe that Customer Experience and customer service are synonymous. Customer Experience has a much broader scope. It refers to every single interaction and experience that a customer has with a company, from the start of their journey to the very end. By widening focus, a business becomes better equipped to identify the flaws in its CX offering and to remedy them. Discover how a company can improve the experience it offers its customers through using Wazoku’s Challenge-Driven Innovation. We also explore why any business should prioritize customer experience, and some of the ways in which our clients have been able to succeed in this area.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Incentives, Recognition, and Rewards

One of the key hurdles that a business must conquer to improve its innovation efforts is employee engagement. The whole process is going to require buy-in from at least some of your workforce, so actively giving reasons for participation is a critical consideration for any innovation manager. In this guide, we’re going to look at the different ways in which organizations meaningfully engage employees in an innovation process. Remembering that monetary reward isn’t the ‘fix all’ some may believe, we’re also going to look at examples of other effective incentives. The Importance of Challenge Planning: The starting point of getting an incentive right is communication. The greatest benefits can be attached to an innovation Challenge, but if the intended audience aren’t made aware of what these are, they’re less likely to engage in the process. By discussing incentives during the Challenge planning process, the communication is much easier to manage. As part of our Challenge planning process at Wazoku, we recommend clients discuss this midway through the process. To begin with, we establish who within the organization is responsible for running the Challenge, followed by a decision on how the question is phrased. Once these foundations are in place, the next stage looks at the audience, and that’s where incentives come in. Operating in this way allows an organization to give enough context to the Challenge and attach an appropriate incentive to it, whilst also ensuring that this isn’t an afterthought. What you’ll find in the guide Above, we’ve explained the importance of incentive, recognition, and reward in getting crowds motivated to participate. In the guide we’ll also explore how they can be used in different contexts with specific examples for each.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: New Products and Services

The need to adapt is inherent to the long-term success of any business. Whether it be through a refreshing of an internal process, the expansion of a relationship with a supplier, or the development of new products and services, continuous upgrades are a vital part of what allows a company to remain relevant. To achieve ambidexterity (exploring new opportunities while exploiting current offerings), companies need to focus on new products and services. In this guide, we go over the reasons why companies have run new products and services Challenges with Wazoku, including: New ways of competing: organizations are constantly having to rethink how they compete. For example, the democratization of the travel industry, through new arrivals like Airbnb and Uber, has forced traditional hotel chains and transport businesses to rethink how to engages with customers. In this guide, we discuss other reasons why companies run Challenges in this area, as well as exploring what organizations are already doing to optimize new products and services. We’ll also highlight some of the potential roadblocks to adaptation that we’ve discovered over the last two decades in the innovation space.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Process Improvement

When people think about the term ‘Innovation’, they often lead to the big and the bold. They imagine it as being once-in-a-lifetime ideas, generated from scratch that turn industries on their head overnight Occasionally, these revolutionary moments do come along. Far more regularly incremental changes, made to existing processes, deliver surprisingly effective results. When people in an organization focus on how to make their jobs more efficient, the potential upsides for the business are infinite. At Wazoku, we’ve found that our Challenge-Driven Methodology allows businesses to focus their innovation targets on any aim they may have. This way of managing innovation efforts can be customized to any organization. By running Challenges that are focused on a particular process, the ideas generated are more aligned to those objectives – making their outcomes more beneficial. In this guide, we’re going to look at some of the reasons for enacting change in this way. We’ll also discuss how organizations are already doing this and share some of the success stories that we at Wazoku have helped businesses achieve over the years. Reasons for Improving Process: In our experience, the reasons for improving processes fall into one of the following categories: Competitive Advantage: businesses that canvas employees who may use the products or services of a competitor gain a better understanding of the shortcomings of its offering. In this way, a company can increase its competitive advantage by fixing these issues. Time to Market: a company that manufactures its own products can find incremental ways of improving this process. In doing so, new products can get to market at a quicker rate than before. Waste Reduction: by improving processes, organizations can eliminate wasted time and resources on tasks that deliver minimal results. Cost-Efficiency: in a lot of businesses, budgets reduce in size: causing staff to have to do more with less. Leveraging our crowd can result in vastly improved processes that allow for cost savings in many cases.

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Guide

Guides to Innovation at Scale: Evaluating Ideas

Companies often make the mistake of believing that idea generation is the only focus of innovation. While this is important, the evaluation of those ideas proves to be just as crucial in ensuring innovation processes deliver positive results. Using Wazoku’s experience in running innovation programs with our customers, we’ll outline the aims of evaluation and look at where evaluation fits into the innovation process. We’ll also share some tips that we’ve discovered, in terms of both personnel and criteria, as to how to optimize the idea evaluation stage. What is Evaluation? In simple terms, the purpose of an evaluation is to decide which ideas are progressed through an innovation process and which are rejected. It is the quality assurance of the innovation world, making sure that investments of time and personnel aren’t wasted on ideas that deliver no value.  As part of Wazoku’s Challenge-Driven Innovation framework, evaluation forms part of a process proven to deliver results that companies wouldn’t have achieved otherwise. One of the main reasons that existing innovation programs deliver negligible results is because the evaluation element was being overlooked. Download the full guide today to discover the secrets to a successful evaluation!

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Guide

Sustainability in Innovation

Innovate more effectively for your Sustainability Challenges 2030 is a crucial year for sustainability, targets have been set across Europe to collectively cut greenhouse gas emissions and consumers are looking to businesses/service providers for guidance.  Business sustainability programs form essential components of how organizations operate and improve. In this guide we will look at: How to Identify key areas for improvement – Not all sustainability initiatives are created equalHow different solutions can be sourced from a variety of different areas of a company’s ecosystemHow businesses such as A2A and Waitrose tackled their own sustainability Challenges A Changing Landscape: As the significance of sustainability has increased, companies have changed the entire approach to the topic. Some research by Deloitte found that over half of organizations surveyed had a Head of Sustainability, but only 15% had a Chief Sustainability Officer in place. As a result of this reality, sustainability practice remains relatively confined to its own silo. Though incremental and limited, this change has been influenced by many different pressures. As sustainability increases in relevance and more companies begin to institute changes to react, these pressures will likely underpin any action taken. In the guide, we’ll take a look at these pressures in detail, as well as discussing possible solutions to these issues.

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Webinar

Practical Steps to building Innovation at Scale

Wazoku partners with John Lewis to present the practical steps to building innovation at Scale. During this webinar, you’ll find out: How the John Lewis Partnership harnesses employees to identify and address customer pain points.Ways you can build a culture of innovation through building capability and increasing innovation capacity. How to effectively connect with employees who aren’t desk based to ensure that everyone can contribute.  

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Webinar

How to Innovate at Scale – a Masterclass with Simon Hill

Simon Hill, CEO & Founder of Wazoku presented why Innovation at Scale is important, what does the journey look like and where do you start.  During this webinar, you’ll learn: Why there’s never been a better time to innovate, and not just because there’s never been a more pressing need to innovate (environment, diversity, inclusion, economy etc).The evidence and rationale behind our belief in innovation in scale.How we’ve built an enterprise Innovation OS to make sustainable innovation at scale possible.Stories of innovation success across our client base including HSBC, Sandvik, Novartis and many other leading global businesses.

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Webinar

Our Open Innovation Journey – Lessons from Bayer Crop Science

Wazoku partnered up with Bayer to have an interactive webinar to discuss their open innovation journey and the success that came out of it. Bayer – A Global Enterprise with a vision of health for all and hunger for none. Bayer has three major divisions which are Pharmaceuticals, Consumer Health Division and Crop Science. During this webinar, you’ll learn how Bayer’s Crop Science Division and subsidiary The Climate Corporation arrived at Open Innovation as an approach to solving important problems, how they utilise Open Innovation now, and where they see their Open Innovation programme in the future. In conversation with Wazoku’s CEO Simon Hill will be: Steven Reiser PhD, Strategic Innovation & Partnerships lead for Climate SciencePhil Taylor PhD, Open Innovation Lead for Crop Science at BayerShilpa Sood PhD, Lead, Cereal/Other Crops Modeling Team at Climate Science.

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Webinar

Innovation in Defence – Managing Innovation at Scale

The Ministry of Defence’s goal is to be “Innovative by Instinct” but what does this look like in practice? Even complex organisations can scale and embed a true culture of innovation inside and outside the business. The Ministry of Defence (MOD), while operating in the public sector, faces similar challenges to private enterprise organisations as it operates globally, 24/7 across The Royal Navy, British Army, the Royal Air Force, Joint Forces Command, Defence Infrastructure Organisation and beyond. The MOD’s goal is to be “Innovative by instinct”, and to do this they use Wazoku’s Idea Management Software to seek ideas and opportunities in unconventional places and unanticipated relationships. Watch this on-demand webinar, with Ministry of Defence innovation leader, Stuart Laws, to understand: The importance of innovating with the people across your internal and external networkHow far the MOD has come in 50 years of innovation plus examples of key outcomesThe shift towards strategic idea management with a true Global Home for IdeasWhat’s in store for the future of innovation in Defence and how you can get involved The Speaker: Stuart Laws, Defence Innovation, Ministry of Defence

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Webinar

Solving Problems Using the Internet of Prepared Minds and Co-creation

Open innovation and co-creation are words that get thrown around a lot by businesses. But can these methodologies solve complex business problems?  This 30-minute on-demand webinar delves into the opportunities that open innovation and co-creation produce and what it really means in the context of solving business problems. The webinar showcases: What is open innovation, the Internet of Prepared minds and co-creation in a business contextThe key challenges and benefits of co-creation for organisationsWhy industries should widen their network to create new opportunitiesSome proven examples of the open innovation and co-creation methodology

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Webinar

Six Ways to Improve Innovation Through Culture Change

What does it take to become a truly innovative organisation? There are still organisations that see innovation as a function, assigning a small group of people the impossible task to transform their business. They then might embark on an overly ambitious transformation programme that fails or loses momentum with little measurable outcome. Wazoku, Goodwind and April all take a different stance – to be truly innovative, organisations need to make innovation part of their DNA, tapping into the creative potential of all their stakeholders: their workforce, ecosystem and customers. Watch this on-demand webinar now, where Innov8rs, Wazoku, Goodwind and April will share six practical ways to improve innovation through culture change, all inspired by real-life customer examples. Hosted by Innov8rs. Presented by: Nicola Darke, Customer Success Director, WazokuHans Gillior, Founder, Goodwind CompanyTim Westall, Founder, April Strategy

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Report

What is Everyday Innovation?

What Everyday Innovation Means to Us Everyday Innovation is a war cry for organisations who understand that they need to innovate but despite their best efforts, are still struggling to turn their aspirations into action. It is an ethos, a new perspective and a guide for every organisation seeking to embed a high-performing culture of innovation. // Simon Hill CEO Wazoku So, what is Everyday innovation? Everyday Innovation is more of a culture than it is a singular thing. Everyday Innovation is a way of integrating an innovative mindset to every fibre of your business. And while many modern businesses see innovation as a necessity, the number of companies who truly innovate is still startlingly low. Though this might not be just down to effort, but down to the mistranslation as to what innovation really is. When companies think of innovation, they tend to think of either slight, incremental innovation (which admittedly many companies are learning to excel at) or massive, game-changing innovations (like Apple changing the mobile market with the iPhone). But what happens in the middle? What are the improvements that are bigger than incremental, but not big enough to change the company from the ground up. Incremental innovation doesn’t redefine the organisation and radical innovations are not common enough. Everyday Innovation consists of five pillars, Strategy, Leadership, Management, Culture and Tools & Processes. To master all five of these is to begin to conquer innovation. With our Everyday innovation report, we answer what innovation really is, and take you through the steps to implement an element of innovation into each of these Big 5. When innovation flows through all five steps, then you are truly stepping ahead of the pack and innovating towards future success.

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Report

The New Innovation Conversation

Investigating the challenges of business innovation Our survey of over 1,000 board members, senior managers, middle managers and everyday workers within large enterprises across the UK sheds further light on the innovation challenges facing businesses. 72% of employees currently have no understanding of what innovation means to their employers38% of managers say innovation isn’t their responsibility because it’s not in their job description79% believe ideas are improved by collaboration at all levels, rather than through reliance on lone thinkers or leaders This report can help you understand: What best-practice innovation looks likeWhere you are on their journey to achieving itWhat you can do to innovate fasterHow to continue evolving innovation

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Report

Design Thinking and Everyday Innovation

Driving better outcomes for your customers The latest report in Wazoku’s Everyday Innovation series provides an introduction and practical advice to incorporate design thinking into your innovation programme. Download the report to: Move past the hype with a clear introduction to design thinking and how you can use it within your organisation to achieve desired outcomes.Understand how the Everyday Innovation framework can help identify customers’ problems, collaborate on creative solutions and bring those solutions to market quickly through Insight, Connection and Adaptability.Learn how organisations, such as Avis Budget Group, are using design thinking to drive better outcomes for their customers.

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Checklist

Six Steps to Becoming a Disruptive Innovator

Embedding disruptive innovation across the organisation Ideas can never be successful if businesses just provide the finance for investment. Management, time, encouragement and commitment are also needed to drive innovation and disruption and embed them in operations and business models. Disruption does not happen overnight; neither does success. You don’t have to invent something new tomorrow to be an agent of disruption; you only have to be willing to reinvent yourself. Setting your organisation on the road to transformation means adopting new ways of thinking and doing business. Get the checklist to uncover the six steps to becoming a disruptive innovator.

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Guide

Unlocking Innovation: A leader’s guide to getting started

Exactly what is innovation management? The process of capturing and managing organisational innovation is essential for business growth. Download the guide to discover how to unlock innovation in your business. Traditionally the territory of R&D teams, today many companies have organisation-wide innovation management programmes. This is due to increased recognition that innovation is essential for driving business growth and maintaining competitive advantage. Successful programmes capture the creativity of employees at every level of the organisation so ideas for new products, business models or process improvements, can be quickly discovered and implemented for maximum value. Wazoku’s Idea Management Software provides a tool for managing innovation wherever and whenever it happens. Ideas can come from anyone within your business, and be shared with a community of peers. The best ideas are routed to your experts and decision-makers to make sure that only those that will drive your business forward are put into practice.  Optimisation, not control Effective innovation management requires three things: a defined process model, a focus on innovation, and the right tools to manage it. It’s important however, to make sure that you’re optimising the process, not controlling it. A strict, hierarchical chain of command can stifle innovation. Instead, employees need to feel individually empowered to drive change and recognised for their innovation. That’s why Idea Management is organic, social and democratic. It allows everyone in your business to create and evaluate ideas with an equal voice. Informal peer networks can then collaborate, refine and vote on ideas so that the best ones make it to the top and individual innovators are rewarded. Making sense of innovation is the key to building a more innovative business today. Download our guide to find out how to get started. Bottom-up emergence and top-down management Great ideas don’t usually come from prescribed brainstorming sessions. Inspiration can come from anywhere and at any time. Your innovation management programme must support idea capture from bottom-up, via employees, as well as top-down from management requests. This flexibility allows you to solve known problems as well as capture unsolicited, spontaneous ideas. Using Wazoku’s Idea Management Software, employees can submit ideas on anything, wherever they are, on any device. All they need is an internet connection. In addition, managers can request ideas on specific subjects to help address existing problems; just think of it as a virtual brainstorm. Start to strategically manage innovation in your organisation. Unlocking Innovation: A leader’s guide to getting started Leaders recognise innovation as critical to long-term growth and survival, but often fail to go from discussing innovation to implementing a rigorous process that allows innovation to thrive. Whilst getting started with an innovation programme can be daunting, it’s imperative. When done right, it can give your organisation access to untapped market potential and the opportunity to differentiate and break away from competition. By downloading this guide, you’ll learn about: Incremental innovation: how small changes can have dramatic impactHow to embed innovation in your people: a sustainable approachRadical innovation: open new industries or disrupt those existingHow to use Design ThinkingIdea Management and how to use it

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eBook

Small Change, Big Impact – Continuous Improvement

Every change starts with an idea. Download the eBook to start working better, smarter, faster. Continuous improvement ideas typically offer smarter, faster or more efficient ways of approaching existing tasks, products or services. These ideas should be easier to implement for the organisation and typically derive more tangible value in a shorter time frame. Continuous improvement is a vital part of innovation management. It is an ongoing and evolving process and ensures that organisations adapt, improve and ready themselves for the future. It is also a way of working that most typically involves and empowers the employees within an organisation. By incrementally improving your businesses processes, products or service offering businesses will often see immediate value through increased efficiencies and reduced complexities through the organisation. Wazoku’s Idea Management Software is being used by global organisations to implement continuous improvement initiatives throughout the businesses to improve operations, realise cost savings and reduce times to market. Small ideas are here to stay, and generally impact and mean so much more to Partners, than the next big strategic change, therefore using a system that allows any Partner, working anywhere in our business, whether driving a van, restocking shelves or managing the marketing POS we use, to submit an idea is very important. Wazoku’s Idea Management Software gives exactly that. // Stuart Eames Operational Improvement Manager, Operational Efficiency, Waitrose By bringing together diverse and disparate workforces to contribute ideas for improvement regardless of scale, our customers benefit from knowledge sharing, creativity and contribution that was previously non-existent. Wazoku works with customers to design innovation programmes that have a clear focus of implementing change in desired areas. Idea Management Software removes perceived barriers between departments or regions, enabling increased transparency across all teams. See how small continuous improvement ideas can have a big impact on your organisation.

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Guide

Guide to Becoming an Everyday Innovator

How do you embed a culture of Everyday innovation? Are you looking to build your company’s innovation capabilities? For an organisation to become an Everyday Innovator, where innovation is embedded across teams, locations and job functions on a daily basis; clear goals, processes, communication and measurement are needed. Using the five pillars of Everyday Innovation: Strategy, Leadership, Management, Culture, and Tools & Processes as a framework, innovation leaders and teams can embark on the iterative journey to becoming an Everyday Innovator. Those who get this right will emerge as true next generation organisations where real competitive advantage is driven by Everyday Innovation being a natural by-product of an amazing organisational culture. This must-read guide offers insights on how to become an Everyday Innovator, including: A 9-step easy to follow modelHow to use outcome-driven change to set objectivesUnderstanding which key metrics to useReal examples of progress and success

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Guide

Retail Innovation Management with Shop Direct and Waitrose

Maximising the benefits of idea management Recently we hosted a breakfast briefing event, featuring speakers from Shop Direct and Waitrose, focusing on their experience using an idea management platform in their innovation programmes. Download our guide and read a summary of the event, featuring their ideas on how to: Increase employee engagementIdentify cost savingsImprove customer satisfaction

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Whitepaper

Disruptors Changing the World: Why Innovation Must be Fuelled by People

Are you a disruptor or are you waiting to be disrupted? In our whitepaper you’ll read about the most successful and disruptive businesses in this decade, how they developed this process, and, most importantly how your business can pivot so it does not get left behind. By downloading this report, you’ll learn about: What is radical innovationHow disruption can be realised and cultivatedSix steps to becoming a disruptive innovatorTonnes of examples of disruptive companies and industries

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Guide

Beginner’s Guide to Idea Management

Why do we need ideas? A strong purpose or a clear goal should be a powerful trigger for the generation of new ideas. The purpose could be born out of necessity, such as a need to make financial savings, or in response to a crisis, such as Facebook’s data breach affecting 87 million users. It may also be driven by a desire to increase transparency and engagement across the organisation. Ideas solve challenges that keep managers and leaders up at night. Next consider how your organisation is currently generating, collating, analysing and implementing ideas. Do you have spreadsheets, an email inbox or another process? These may be difficult to manage and correlate similar ideas, lack insight for participants into other ideas shared or the ability to track progress with their own idea. One centralised, global home for ideas, like Wazoku’s cloud-based idea management platform can ensure this process gives everyone a voice and role in the innovation process. What does idea management software enable you to do? Capture and evaluate ideas within an organisation, with your customers, your partners or even the world, in a structured way.The ability to select and refine ideas that offer the greatest potential business value.Have an effective idea management process.Increase revenue and have a more engaged, productive workforce, ecosystem and customer crowd.Generate ideas as part of dedicated innovation campaigns or continuous idea capture. Wazoku’s Idea Management Software allows you to: Discover the best ideas – and build process and accountability for how to progress them.Run campaigns or challenges within different areas or departments that align with strategic objectives.Collaborate with 10 or 10,000 users, using the comment, like and share functions.Match the right influencers, experts and decision-makers to the right ideas through our smart AI-enabled recommendation engine. Transparent, collaborative process All too often idea software simply provides an online version of the traditional office suggestion box. Ideas go in, a designated person or team read through the suggestions, and a few are selected for further development. Unfortunately this type of system leaves no room for wider collaboration and employees are often unaware of the outcome of their idea. The best idea software tools provide a more transparent and democratic process. Those that also encourage collaboration offer even greater value, as they tend to deliver more complete ideas, resulting in quicker implementation and broader employee buy-in. Wazoku’s Idea Management Software does exactly that. In fact, it not only makes the idea management process completely transparent, democratic and social, it also allows you to reward those who suggest and develop new ideas. Software is not enough Simply providing the right tools to capture and sort ideas is not enough to sustain an ongoing innovation programme. Companies considering idea software need to think about ways to initially encourage employee involvement and develop a culture of innovation over time.

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eBook

10 Steps From Idea Generation To Implementation

Every successfully implemented idea or product is a result of a long and painstakingly supervised innovation process. While principles and methods of idea development are universal for all industries, there is no strict rule regarding the steps from idea generation to implementation. Idea generation is a crucial process for businesses looking to innovate and gain competitive advantage. When you generate ideas with your workforce, ecosystem, customers and beyond – using idea management software  – you’ll collect invaluable insight to improve processes, create breakthrough products or services, disrupt markets and much more. So having a defined process to take these generated ideas and put them into action is a powerful necessity. Here is a list of 10 steps that follow the idea management process from idea generation to implementation. 1 – Idea Selection So you’ve noticed a good idea. Whether you have received an email to an inbox, a notification in your idea management system, or have opened a note from a suggestion box, everyone shares the same starting point – idea selection. Just because someone has suggested an idea themselves, it does not mean that they are always the right person to see it through to completion. It is on you as an innovation leader to find a person with the right strengths, professional aspirations and experience to deliver this project in a meaningful way – innovation cannot be a secondary priority. At this point, you also want to make sure that the person chosen to lead this idea will have some form of resources available to start making it happen. If you cannot delegate preliminary resources at this stage, you’re going to have major problems implementing this down the line. There is no obligation for your selected idea to be a fully-fledged business case. At this stage, an idea is understood to be a hypothesis and might well be altered or changed later. 2 – Scrutiny Of All Aspects Analytically evaluate all aspects of your potential opportunity like an investor. The larger the project, the more the idea’s ROI will be scrutinised. Key aspects of your overall assessment are: The potential target audience you wish to reachThe potential value this idea or product could represent for your businessHow much of a ‘risk’ does this represent (of course, what you define as a risk is up to you)Market viability – does anyone actually want this? While ROI doesn’t always reflect a financial value, it is important you are fully aware of the benefits and risks that follow with your project. 3 – Feedback Collect opinions from people aware of the market, competitors, business model and similar business experience. Their practical expertise, and that of target customers, will help predict the likelihood of idea success. The real test is when the product is launched, but this preliminary research gives a hint. Build a wide range of opinions – as wide as you can. This is essentially what you did in step 2, but shared outwardly. Find your community – whether that be your stakeholders, your employees or your customers. 4 – Feedback Reaction Make necessary changes to your product, strategy and business plan according to the feedback. Anticipate the needed capital to reach set targets. Design an implementation plan with the main objectives in the short term and who will execute them. Just as important as receiving feedback is how you respond to it. At this stage it is important to understand the value of compromise over resilience. While a full-speed-ahead attitude is admirable, the nature of your idea at this stage is vulnerable to the biggest barriers to innovation – sign-off and funding. At this stage, you will also need to start thinking about sourcing the capital required to turn this idea into reality, as you will most likely be asking for funding, or at the very least, resources. It is vital at this stage to take the feedback in and adapt to meet requirements. What matters most is getting a minimum viable working product / project off the ground, even if it’s not the fully-scoped idea you had in mind; there is plenty of time to reiterate and grow from here. 5 – A Basic Version / Product Rather than setting yourself the overly ambitious goal of creating a finished product straight away, focus on simplifying and getting a bare minimum offering out there first. It’s important to keep development open to change and feedback, and by holding back until something is ‘just right’ you ensure that you gain minimal ranges of opinion – and are far more likely to be caught out. A bare minimum offering shows target customers what the product is or will eventually be. A good idea is to build the basic product as quickly as possible, and to make it inexpensive – you have to present a low barrier for entry. What often gets misconstrued – in the tech space especially – is that getting a product to market isn’t at all about working fast, cutting corners and doing an overall rushed job. You don’t need to drive yourself into a crazy rush just to get your product finished and out there. On the other end of the scale and maybe equally as damaging – you mustn’t scale back your ambitions to tiny projects just to ensure you don’t spend too much time. Both of these result in a sub-standard offering. The key is to start with your minimum viable product (MVP), get that right and functional and then build from there. 6 – Hitting The Market Get your product to market quickly and start examining customer reactions. While one manufacturer waits and refines their product to make it ideal for customers, a competitor sells successfully an acceptable similar product. But why force out an unfinished project? Many would react in shock being advised to release something that’s not done. So, why does this matter? It matters because right now, it is essentially still just you and your idea. Even with co-workers and even stakeholders involved, it is still entirely internal. You assume that people would be interested in your project, or buying your product, but you have nothing of any real weight until you test to find out. A minimum viable project isn’t just a way to get a working example live so your market can start engaging, it’s also a very good way to minimise risk. If your project doesn’t have the reaction from the market you’ve expected, here is where you can go back to the drawing board without losing a significant investment. 7 – Go For A Test Drive Early testing of business experience factors such as pricing model, visual branding, messaging and customer experience can be done at this stage. This by no means is your final version, but keep in mind the promises you make in this stage as everything is still up for change. This is a dry-run for your business, where you can gauge real market response. It is entirely up to you how narrow or broad your test drive is. This is also, even more so than the product itself, the perfect testing ground for marketing messaging, sales pitches, promotions and campaigns. 8 – Corrections And Improvements This is quite possibly the most important stage of the ten. How you respond to feedback will determine how close your product will resonate with the market. Remember, you want criticisms and questions; if you get only positive responses back you’ve either created something perfect (nice!…but…unlikely) or your audience just isn’t the right one. In truth, this is also stage 11; you will want to continuously improve your offering, and there’s no better way to do that than to listen to what your customers struggle with. If focused on a more digital deliverable, this is an incredibly useful QA stage of sorts to test User Experience (UX) and User Interface (UI). Additionally, if your MVP’s UI & UX are causing confusion, something needs to change here as your product is only going to get busier and more developed. 9 – Growth Planning Updates on the product, business plan, marketing and financial strategies enable expansion. If it really proves to be a winning pitch, this is also a good time to gather resources and raise capital. This is where you truly start building for the future. Your idea is no doubt exploding with potential features, implementations or applications, and this is where you get to map out exactly what your idea’s picture of success is, as well as the timeframe in which you wish to achieve these goals. As you’re currently sitting at MVP status, you will want to evaluate exactly what is required to drive you forward. Key aspects to focus on in this stage are: Roadmap of product updatesOverall business planMarketing strategyResources requiredCapital requiredAppropriate stretch goals 10 – Time To Expand It might be the last point, but it isn’t the end of your journey. Expansion should always be followed by corrections and improvements, followed again by expansion. It is a constant cycle of continuous, autonomous improvements that we call Everyday Innovation. With a proven business strategy, an ambitious expansion plan, engaged stakeholders already invested, a ready and responsive market and an outcome that will continue to grow and improve, your idea is set to take on the world. This example of a success story would not be possible without the right idea management process in place. Since innovation plays a central role in every sustainable business strategy, many companies rely on innovation software to help them capture, evaluate and implement the brightest ideas.

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Innovation at Scale: Agile Innovation

A framework for Innovation at Scale Repeatable, renewable, recurring value- creation cannot happen without a process for routinely developing ideas through to impact.These routines of capturing, developing and selecting ideas not only need to be staffed and managed, but they also need to be understood and valued by everyone within the organization.The Ambidextrous Organization- in order to be successful in the long term, businesses need to explore new ideasand forms of value creation, while also exploiting their existing capabilities.They need to embed and enable this capability across every part of their organization in a systemic and structured way, finding the right balance between exploitation for today and exploration for tomorrow (see below). The balance (mix) will vary significantly across organizations, over time and by context. The Ambidextrous Organization What is Agile Innovation Agile Innovation is framework within which people, teams and organizations can address complex change, transformation and innovation problems at scale. The framework is underpinned by our proprietary Challenge Driven Innovation methodology, a proven approach that accelerates your innovation outcomes and increases your capacity and capabilities for innovation at scale. It applies agile thinking and techniques to the process of value creation at the heart of all innovation and transformation programmes. Why Agile Innovation is critical: Pull risk forward – fail fastPush cost back – lean mindsetScale capacity – create an unlimited capacity for innovationScale capability – build an empowered and enabled culture of innovationQuality – dramatically improve success rates vs traditional innovation approaches

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Guides to Innovation at Scale: Intrapreneurship Programs

No one knows a business better than the people who work there every day. That’s one of the reasons why intrapreneurship programs are a great asset to have in your innovation toolkit. Improvements to existing operations and new ideas worth exploring are things that these colleagues, known as ‘intrapreneurs’, ponder on a regular basis. Having a scheme in an organization that gives leaders a way to identify these intrapreneurs and give them a framework to develop their ideas helps a business to stay relevant. As a way of fostering this culture of innovation, intrapreneurship programs rank among the best out there. In this guide, we’ll discuss both how these programs can be introduced into a business environment and outline the numerous benefits they bring to an organization. One key benefit is providing a way to view the relative health of the company. Deliver value across your business by downloading the full guide today.

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